The Story Collider Episode: Bethany Brookshire: A Perfect Mentor

Bethany Brookshire: A Perfect Mentor

By: The Story Collider

Published:

01/12/2015

Duration:

12:24

Advisory Rating:

Explicit

Description:

Lost after arriving at grad school, Bethany Brookshire is happy to finally find a perfect mentor. Bethany Brookshire has a B.S. in Biology and a B.A. in Philosophy from The College of William and Mary, a Ph.D. in Physiology and Pharmacology from Wake Forest University School of Medicine. She is the guest Editor of the Open Laboratory Anthology of Science Blogging, 2009, and the winner of the Society for Neuroscience Next Generation Award and the Three Quarks Daily Science Writing Award, among others. She is currently the Science Education Writer for Science News for Students. She blogs at Eureka!Lab and at Scicurious. You can follow her on Twitter as @scicurious.

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