Fresh Air

Fresh Air

By: NPR

Rating:

4.5 (2911 ratings)

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Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.

Hot Episode Picks

The 'Moneyball' author is writing a series of articles for 'Vanity Fair' about President Trump's picks to lead federal agencies — and the consequences of those appointments. Also, classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz reviews a recording of Brahms by Brazilian pianist Nelson Freire.

Jimmy Fallon

10/12/2017

49:00

The 'Tonight Show' host talks with Terry Gross about his new children's book, being entertaining in times of tragedy, and the biggest thing he learned from his time at 'SNL.' Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new Netflix series 'Mindhunter.'

Recent Episodes

Raphael Bob-Waksberg's animated comedy series for Netflix satirizes Hollywood using a mix of human and animal characters. "Part of the original pitch was like, 'What's Mr. Ed like behind the scenes?'" BoJack (a horse) is a depressed, alcoholic, sexist former sitcom star in the #MeToo era.

Jarrett J. Krosoczka's National Book Award-nominated graphic memoir 'Hey, Kiddo' is about growing up with a mother addicted to heroin. Krosoczka initially didn't want to write about his childhood because he felt it was too dark. "It took it took a long time for me to gain that courage to make this book," he says. "I share that for those young readers out there who are dealing with heavy issues at home. ... I feel like I owe it to these readers to put myself out there."

Comic Phoebe Robinson

10/15/2018

48:43

Robinson is the co-host of '2 Dope Queens,' a live comedy show and podcast showcasing comedians from a variety of different backgrounds. The show is now a series of four HBO specials, with more in the works. She also hosts the podcast 'Sooo Many White Guys.' Her new book of personal essays is 'Everything's Trash, But It's Okay.' Also, Maureen Corrigan reviews the new novel 'Washington Black' about a runaway slave. And 'Fresh Air' producer Sam Briger interviews the book's author Esi Edugyan.

The Oscar-winning director ('La La Land') talks about his new film, 'First Man,' which stars Ryan Gosling as Neil Armstrong in the 10 years leading up to the moon landing. Chazelle wanted to show how loud, rickety, and nauseating space travel was at the time. He used full-scale replicas that spun and shook violently — with the actors and cameras inside. "The sweat you see on screen will be real. The shaking will be real. Even some of the terror will be real. The nausea will be real. And, by extension, the audience will really feel that they themselves are in that capsule too." Leonard Cohen died in 2016, leaving behind many unpublished poems and lyrics. His son Adam Cohen discusses 'The Flame,' a collection of some of Leonard's final works.

The 'Pink Flamingos' filmmaker made a name for himself by setting new lows in bad taste. Now, a new retrospective of his work is at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Originally broadcast 2004 and 2010. Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews Amazon's 'The Romanoffs,' a new anthology series by 'Mad Men' creator Matthew Weiner.

Journalist Vanessa Grigoriadis, author of 'Blurred Lines,' says one of the challenges when it comes to handling sexual assault cases on college campuses is that there isn't a universally agreed-upon definition of what sexual assault is. She spent three years reporting on college campuses for the book. Grigoriadis talks about the Kavanaugh hearings, rape culture, and how she sees the national conversation about sexual assault shifting. Also, Ken Tucker reviews an album by bluegrass musicians Hazel Dickens and Alice Gerrard, and Justin Chang reviews 'First Man,' the new Neil Armstrong biopic starring Ryan Gosling.

The Oscar-winning director ('La La Land') talks about his new film, 'First Man,' which stars Ryan Gosling as Neil Armstrong in the 10 years leading up to the moon landing. Chazelle wanted to show how loud, rickety, and nauseating space travel was at the time. He used full-scale replicas that spun and shook violently — with the actors and cameras inside. "The sweat you see on screen will be real. The shaking will be real. Even some of the terror will be real. The nausea will be real. And, by extension, the audience will really feel that they themselves are in that capsule too." Also, classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz reviews Yo-Yo Ma's most recent album of Bach cello suites.

P.W. Singer and Emerson Brooking say social media has been manipulated to fuel popular uprisings and affect the course of military and political campaigns. Their new book is 'LikeWar.' The story of the 2011 terror attack on a Norwegian summer camp is the subject of a new movie by Paul Greengrass, the British filmmaker best known for such acclaimed docudramas as 'United 93,' and 'Captain Phillips.' John Powers reviews '22 July,' streaming on Netflix.

Leonard Cohen died in 2016, leaving behind many unpublished poems and lyrics. His son Adam Cohen discusses 'The Flame,' a collection of some of Leonard's final works. Adam remembers when his father was composing his best known song, Hallelujah. "It took him 12 years. It started when I was very, very young. I'd hear verses, I think there are 84 verses to that song," Adam says.

Filmmaker Tamara Jenkins drew on her own "by-any-means-necessary" effort to have a child for her new film 'Private Life.' It stars Kathryn Hahn and Paul Giamatti as a couple in their 40s who are struggling with IVF. Critic David Edelstein reviews 'A Star is Born.' 'New Yorker' staff writer Evan Osnos talks how Facebook became vulnerable to spreading disinformation, how Zuckerberg is attempting to combat fake news, and the inherent problems in monitoring political content without violating users' free speech.