Fresh Air

Fresh Air

By: NPR

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4.5 (2911 ratings)

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Fresh Air from WHYY, the Peabody Award-winning weekday magazine of contemporary arts and issues, is one of public radio's most popular programs. Hosted by Terry Gross, the show features intimate conversations with today's biggest luminaries.

Hot Episode Picks

The 'Moneyball' author is writing a series of articles for 'Vanity Fair' about President Trump's picks to lead federal agencies — and the consequences of those appointments. Also, classical music critic Lloyd Schwartz reviews a recording of Brahms by Brazilian pianist Nelson Freire.

Jimmy Fallon

10/12/2017

49:00

The 'Tonight Show' host talks with Terry Gross about his new children's book, being entertaining in times of tragedy, and the biggest thing he learned from his time at 'SNL.' Also, TV critic David Bianculli reviews the new Netflix series 'Mindhunter.'

Recent Episodes

When Karen Piper was six her family moved to the Mojave Desert to a secretive missile testing facility. In 'A Girl's Guide To Missiles' she describes how her parents designed weapons, but she didn't understand how it all connected to war. Also, jazz critic Kevin Whitehead reviews Andy Biskin's 'Songs From The Alan Lomax Collection.'

In his autobiography, 'Siren Song,' Seymour Stein writes about how he started out in the music business as a teen before going on to sign groundbreaking artists like Talking Heads, The Ramones, Madonna, and Ice-T. Jim Gavin, creator of the AMC comedy series 'Lodge 49,' talks about strip mall culture, why he likes to write characters who are fools, and explains why he defines success as "just sticking around." Book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews 'Baby, You're Gonna Be Mine,' a book of stories by Kevin Wilson.

In 1973, Jennifer Fox wrote a story for her 8th grade English class called 'The Tale,' which alluded to an intimate relationship between a 13-year-old girl and her running and riding coaches. Her teacher thought it was fiction. It wasn't. "I wrote at 13 with no concept of abuse at all," she says. "It was a love story." Decades later, Fox's mother found the story, forcing her to confront her past trauma and see it with new eyes. Fox wrote and directed the new HBO film 'The Tale,' starring Laura Dern. Also, film critic Justin Chang reviews Spike Lee's new film 'BlacKkKlansman.' Julian Adler, co-author of 'Start Here,' and Judge Victoria Pratt discuss alternatives to jail, including community service, social services and even personal essays. Adler and his co-author Greg Berman write, jails "are accelerants of human misery."

Sedaris pulls from his decades-old diaries in 'Theft by Finding.' In it, he revisits major turning points, such as the death of his mother, as well as more prosaic, everyday moments. Sedaris talks with Terry Gross about how his writing has changed, leaving Raleigh for the Art Institute of Chicago, and why he stopped drinking. (Originally broadcast May 2017) Film critic Justin Chang reviews Spike Lee's new film 'BlacKkKlansman.'

'How ICE Went Rogue'

08/09/2018

47:12

Journalist Franklin Foer says President Trump has "radicalized" Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), opening the door for the agency to deport any undocumented immigrant. "Never before have we had such a large, dedicated police force whose mission is to remove undocumented immigrants from the communities in which they're rooted." Foer's cover story in 'The Atlantic' explores how the Trump administration's immigration policy relies upon cultivating fear. Linguist Geoff Nunberg examines the term "deep state."

In 1973, Jennifer Fox wrote a story for her 8th grade English class called 'The Tale,' which alluded to an intimate relationship between a 13-year-old girl and her running and riding coaches. Her teacher thought it was fiction. It wasn't. "I wrote at 13 with no concept of abuse at all," she says. "It was a love story." Decades later, Fox's mother found the story, forcing her to confront her past trauma and see it with new eyes. Fox wrote and directed the new HBO film 'The Tale,' starring Laura Dern, about her reckoning with the abuse. "The film is about the stories we tell ourselves to survive," she says.

David Kirkpatrick, author of Into the Hands of the Soldiers, says the Obama White House watched Arab democracy fall and now the Trump administration is embracing Egypt's autocratic president. Kirkpatrick was the New York Times Cairo Bureau Chief from 2011-15. During the coup, he was in Rabaa Square when soldiers massacred protesters, killing as many as 1,000 people.

Julian Adler, co-author of 'Start Here,' and Judge Victoria Pratt discuss alternatives to jail, including community service, social services and even personal essays. Adler and his co-author Greg Berman write, jails "are accelerants of human misery. If you are poor or mentally ill or struggling to keep your family together when you enter, the chances are that all of these conditions will be markedly worse when you come out." Rock critic Ken Tucker reviews the album 'Hive Mind' by the band The Internet.

After being kidnapped in Somalia, journalist Michael Scott Moore was desperate to escape. But jumping off the deck of a boat didn't work. "They found me eventually with the search lights," he says. He tells 'Fresh Air' about how he was beaten and considered suicide before eventually being released for ransom. Moore's book is 'The Desert and the Sea.' TV critic David Bianculli reviews 'Better Call Saul' season 4, which begins Monday, Aug. 6. Former 'Monk' star Tony Shalhoub recently won a Tony award for his role in 'The Band's Visit' and is up for an Emmy for 'The Marvelous Mrs. Maisel.' He talks to 'Fresh Air' about why the film 'Big Night' was a turning point in his career.

We mark the return of the 'Breaking Bad' spinoff by listening to archival interviews with star Bob Odenkirk, series co-creator Peter Gould and actors Giancarlo Esposito and Jonathan Banks. Season 4 begins Monday, Aug. 6.